PSI

PSI

Active Grants

ADAPT Online: After Deployment Adaptive Parenting Tools
Funding period: 2013–2015
Principal Investigator: Dr. David DeGarmo
Funded by: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
Grant number: R44 HD066896-02

The project goal is to use the ADAPT Online intervention to address the parenting needs of reintegrated military families potentially at risk for depression, anxiety, substance abuse, mental illness, and posttraumatic stress.

 

Behavioral Effects of Teen Exposure to Multiple Risk Behaviors in Media
Funding period: 2014–2016
Principal Investigator: Dr. Atika Khurana
Funded by: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
Grant number: R21 HD079615

This project is examining the influence of exposure to multiple risk portrayals in popular movies and TV shows on adolescent health risk behaviors.

 

Brain-Based Intervention to Remediate the Effects of Early Adversity on Inhibitory Control
Funding period: Jan.–Dec. 2015
Principal Investigator: Dr. Elliot Berkman
Frontiers of Innovation initiative, Harvard Center on the Developing Child

This study evaluated a neurally informed intervention to reduce adolescents’ peer-linked risk behaviors by increasing inhibitory control in peer contexts. It also sought to clarify effects of early adversity on inhibitory control and the mechanisms through which those effects could be remediated with intervention.

 

Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students
Funding period: 2016–2018
Principal Investigator: Dr. Jessica Cronce
Funded by: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

This pilot study is adapting the Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students (BASICS) for use with community college students by using an iterative process of adaptation and development, prototype models and instructions, focus groups, usability testing, and individual interviews. A delivery method will be developed that adapts normative and consequence-related content specific for CC students and provides protective behavioral strategies via text-messages.

 

Comparing Web, Group, and Telehealth Formats of a Military Parenting Program
Funding period: 2014–2019
Principal Investigator: Dr. David DeGarmo
Funded by: United States Department of Defense
Grant number: W81XWH-14-1-0143

This research is testing e-technology approaches to increase access and portability of a family-based substance use intervention for reintegrated military reserve personnel and their families.

 

Early Onset vs. Pre-Existing Vulnerabilities in Adolescent Drug Use
Funding period: 2012–2016
Principal Investigator: Dr. Atika Khurana
Funded by: National Institute of Drug Abuse
Grant number: R01 DA033996

The central goal of this project is to identify the neurocognitive precursors underlying dysfunctional forms of drug use and symptoms of substance use disorders during the late-adolescence years.

 

Effectiveness of a Web-Enhanced Parenting Program for Military Families
Funding period: 2014–2016
Principal Investigator: Dr. David DeGarmo
Funded by: NIDA
Grant number: R01 DA030114

This study is examining whether an Oregon Parent Management Training intervention, enhanced with e-technology and adapted for combat-deployed families, will reduce risk behaviors associated with youth substance use by improving child and parent adjustment.

 

Endogenous Opioids in Meditation Pain Relief
Funding period: 2014–2015
Principal Investigators: Dr. Elliot Berkman & Lisa May, University of Oregon
Funded by: Mind and Life Institute
Grant number: 2013-VARELA-MAY

This experiment is using the opioid antagonist Naloxone to research meditation-based pain relief to determine if opioid receptors are activated and if endogenous opioids interact with trait factors in meditation-based pain relief.

 

Family Check-Up Online: Support for Middle School Families in Rural Oregon
Funding period: 2015− 2017
Principal Investigator: Dr. Elizabeth Stormshak
Funded by: Ford Family Foundation
Grant number: 20130431

The Family Check-Up-Online for middle school youths and families uses multimedia and technology to support effective family management, including tailored messaging, in-person feedback, and interactive instruction.

 

Family and Peer Processes and Gene–Environment Interplay in Early Adolescence: An Adoption Study
Funding period: 2014−2016
Principal Investigator: Dr. Leslie Leve
Funded by: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
Grant number: R56DH042608

This study aims to disentangle inherited influences from social–environmental influences on youth behavior problems and competencies by examining how children develop over time, how inherited risks are overcome, and inherited strengths help children develop to their fullest potential.

 

Fathering Through Change: Online Parent Training for Divorced Fathers
Funding period: 2014–2016
Principal Investigator: Dr. David DeGarmo
Funded by: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
Grant number: R44 HD075499-02

This project seeks to provide divorced fathers with skills necessary to be effective parents and coparents following divorce, by testing effectiveness of the FTC on fathers' parenting skills, coparenting conflict reduction, and cooperation.

 

Gene–Environment Interplay and Childhood Obesity: An Adoption Study
Funding period: 2011–2016
Principal Investigators: Dr. Jody Ganiban, George Washington University; Dr. Leslie Leve, University of Oregon
Funded by: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease
Grant number: R01 DK090264

This study is exploring the eating habits and behaviors of adopted children, adoptive parents, and birth parents from birth to middle childhood. A study focus is identification of environmental and genetic factors that promote physical growth and healthy weight.

 

Gene–Environment Interplay and the Development of Psychiatric Symptoms in Children
Funding period: 2010–2016
Principal Investigators: Dr. Leslie Leve, University of Oregon; Dr. Jenae Neiderhiser, Penn State University
Funded by: National Institute of Mental Health
Grant number: R01 MH092118

This study is examining the interplay between genetic, prenatal, and postnatal environmental influences on early pathways to various behaviors, including anxiety and depression, by interviewing adoptive parents about child behavior and symptoms between ages 6 and 8 years.

 

Girls-Specific Prevention Program for Substance Use and Delinquency
Funding period: 2015–2017
Principal Investigator: Dr. Leslie Leve
Funded by: National Institute on Drug Abuse

This program is testing effectiveness of a program for justice-involved girls at risk of escalating delinquency and substance use. It uses cognitive-behavioral and moral reasoning principles found to be effective for at-risk youths. It emphasizes management of distressing internalizing symptoms, relationship-based scenarios for skill generalization, expanded cognitive restructuring strategies, and parent engagement and skill building.

 

Harvard Frontiers of Innovation
Funding period: 2014–2016
Principal Investigators: Dr. Philip Fisher
Funded by: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Annie E. Casey Foundation, Buffet Early Childhood Fund
Subcontract with: Harvard University

FOI, designed to improve child outcomes, brings together researchers, practitioners, and policymakers to codevelop prevention and intervention programs to build caregiver capacities. A centralized database and data management protocol are being created to be used across FOI sites.

 

Hemera Frontiers of Innovation
Funding period: 2015–2016
Principal Investigator: Dr. Philip Fisher
Frontiers of Innovation initiative, Harvard Center on the Developing Child

This award supports the Fisher Stress Neurobiology and Prevention Lab’s work with the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University to develop and test intervention programs to improve the lives of children facing adversity, to develop and scale a model for supporting intervention development and implementation for new center sites, and to continue to develop a centralized database library.

 

KEEP-P, a Prevention Intervention for Foster Preschoolers
Funding period: 2013–2018
Principal Investigator: Dr. Philip Fisher
Funded by: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
Grant number: 5R01HD075716

This randomized clinical trial of a low-cost, group-based intervention for foster preschoolers and their caregivers aims to improve parenting, reduce rates of disrupted placements, and improve child outcomes among this population.

 

Parenting to Prevent Substance Use in Late Adolescence
Funding period: 2012–2017
Principal Investigator: Dr. Elizabeth Stormshak
Funded by: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
Grant number: R01 HD075150

Researchers are examining how parent–youth relationships in late adolescence may be protective or may contribute to escalating substance use and abuse during the transition to adulthood.

 

Prevention of Substance Use in At-risk Students: A Family-centered Web Program
Funding period: 2015–2020
Principal Investigators: Elizabeth Stormshak
Funded by: National Institute on Drug Abuse
Grant number: R01 DA037628

This study is examining the hypothesis that a brief, tailored, web-based family-centered intervention provided to families of middle school youths can reduce behavioral risk, enhance parenting skills, and improve family climate and child outcomes.

 

Psychometric Investigation of Universal Screening for Social-Economical Development in Preschool Using Parent and Teacher Informants
Funding period: 2015–2019
Co-Principal Investigator: Dr. Randy Kamphaus
Funded by: Institute of Education Sciences
Grant number: R305A150152

This project is evaluating the psychometric properties of the Behavioral and Emotional Screening System Parenting Rating Scale-Preschool Form (BESS PRS-P), a parent-report screening tool. Parent and teacher data and school records are being used to examine associations between ratings of children's social-behavioral risk and child social and academic outcomes in kindergarten and first grade.

 

RCT of Parent Training for Preschoolers with Delays
Funding period: 2011–2016
Principal Investigator: Dr. Laura Lee McIntyre
Funded by: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
Grant number: DA212880

This study is examining effects of early childhood interventions on children's adaptive behavior, problem behavior, and family well-being among 200 families with preschool children with developmental delays or disabilities.

 

Siblings Reared Apart: A Naturalistic Cross-Fostering Study of Young Children
Funding period: 2013–2017
Principal Investigator: Dr. Leslie Leve
Funded by: National Institute on Drug Abuse
Grant number: R01 DA035062

This study is examining pathways to development by isolating effects of the rearing environment from effects of genes by assessing sibling pairs in which one sibling was reared from birth by an adoptive family and the other from birth by the biological mother.

 

Tailored Inhibitory Control Training to Reverse EA-linked Deficits in Mid-life
Funding period: 2014–2016
Principal Investigator: Dr. Elliot Berkman
Funded by: National Institute on Aging
Grant number: R01-AG048840

A neurally informed model of inhibitory control is being used to test the efficacy of an intervention for mid-life individuals with early adversity that can flexibly and cost effectively address inhibitory control and health-risking behaviors.

 

Targeting Neurobiological and Behavioral Mechanisms of Self-Regulation in High-Risk Families
Funding period: 2015–2019
Principal Investigators: Dr. Elizabeth Skowron, Dr. Phil Fisher
Funded by: National Institute on Drug Abuse
Grant number: R01 DA036533

This clinical trial is testing the effects of Parent–Child Interaction Therapy for maltreating families and identifying biobehavioral pathways to positive change in parenting practices and child outcomes. Participating families are assessed for psychological/physical health, behavior, heart rate, brain activity, and reductions in child abuse/neglect.

 

Testing the Efficacy of an Ecological Approach to Family Intervention and Treatment During Early Elementary School to Prevent Problem Behavior and Improve Academic Outcomes
Funding period: 2014–2018
Principal Investigator: Dr. Elizabeth Stormshak
Funded by: Institute of Education Sciences
Grant number: R305A140189

This study is evaluating the efficacy of the Family Check-Up during the transition into elementary school by targeting family contextual risks and family management skills; self-regulation, academic learning, and social competence skills; and problem behavior.

 

Translational Drug Abuse Prevention Center (TDAP)
Funding period: 2013–2018
Principal Investigators: Drs. Philip Fisher, Leslie Leve, David DeGarmo, University of Oregon; Dr. Patricia Chamberlain, Oregon Social Learning Center
Funded by: National Institute on Drug Abuse
Grant number: 1P50DA035763

To improve outcomes for children and families involved in child welfare systems, targets include mechanisms associated with early life adversity and adolescents’ risky decision making, adolescent girls’ drug use and engagement in HIV-risk behaviors, and fidelity of implementation of extant evidence-based interventions into CWS settings.

 

Using Online Learning and Coaching to Increase the Competency of Early Childhood Teachers to Impact School Readiness for Children Exposed to Trauma
Funding period: 2015–2019
Co-Principal Investigators: Dr. Phillip Fisher, Melanie Berry, University of Oregon; Bridget Hatfield, Oregon State University
Funded by: Institute of Education Sciences
Grant number: R305A150107

An online course and coaching program is being developed to help early childhood teachers implement practices to improve academic and social-behavioral outcomes for young children who have experienced trauma, who are often at elevated risk for difficulties in school. A program will be developed to give instruction and individualized coaching to preschool teachers.

 

Utilizing Adoption-Based Research Designs to Examine the Interplay Between Family Relationship Processes and Child Developmental Outcomes
Funding period: 2015–2015
Principal Investigators: Dr. Leslie Leve
Funded by: Economic and Social Research Council, United Kingdom

This project uses a longitudinal U.S. adoption-at-birth sample and a UK sample of children conceived through in vitro fertilization (IVF) to understand the interplay between family interaction patterns, parent mental health, and child symptoms of psychopathology.