PSI

PSI

In 2015, seventy-six articles published in peer-reviewed journals reported findings from PSI studies.

Graduate Students

Kate Beauchamp, MS, is a fifth-year doctoral student in the Clinical Psychology program at the University of Oregon, under the mentorship of Dr. Philip Fisher and Dr. Elliot Berkman. She is working at PSI as a project coordinator on the Training Adolescent Self-Control (TASC) project directed by Dr. Berkman. She began working at PSI in September 2014 funded by pilot grants for the TASC project through the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the Frontiers of Innovation at the Harvard Center on the Developing Child. Her current research interests include investigating both how experiences of early life stress affect neurobiological systems (e.g., the stress response system, neural systems underlying executive function) and also how this information can be leveraged to design neurobiologically-informed interventions to mitigate deleterious effects of early life stress across development. 

 

Elisa DeVargas, BA, is a third-year doctoral student in counseling psychology at the University of Oregon who is working under the mentorship of Dr. Elizabeth Stormshak. She is a minority investigator on the Parenting to Prevent Substance Use in Late Adolescence project directed by Dr. Stormshak. She began working at PSI in October 2013 after having been awarded a supplemental research grant for ethnic minorities from the National Institutes of Health and Department of Health and Human Services. Her future career plans include working with children, adolescents, and families, specifically those living in monolingual, Spanish-speaking homes. She is interested in better understanding school and home environments and the experiences of Latino and other ethnic/racial minority children and adolescents in these contexts.

 

Jessica Flannery, MS, is a third-year doctoral student in the Clinical Psychology program at the University of Oregon, under the co-mentorship of Dr. Phillip Fisher and Dr. Jennifer Pfeifer. She is currently working on Teen Decision Study directed by PSI scientists Dr. Phillip Fisher and Dr. Jennifer Pfeifer. She began working on this project as a graduate research fellow through PSI in March 2014. She recently received a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, and will continue to work extensively on this project. Her research interests broadly focus on how early adverse experiences influence neuroendocrine pathways and function as well their impact on the development of brain structures and connectivity between brain regions specifically associated with social and emotional development.

 

John Flournoy, MS, is a fourth-year doctoral student in psychology at the University of Oregon who is working with mentors Dr. Jennifer Pfeifer in developmental social neuroscience and Dr. Sanjay Srivastava in personality psychology. He seeks to characterize cognitive processes underlying the perception of individual differences in the self and in others, and to identify how those perceptions influence decision making. Specifically, his recent research has examined how neural sensitivity to emotional expressions is linked to prosocial behaviors, developmental trends and causes of personality change, and how social context influences risky decision making. He is also keenly interested in and proficient with a wide variety of statistical and computational methods. 

 

Emily Reich, BA, is a doctoral student in the counseling psychology program at the University of Oregon who is working under the mentorship of Dr. Leslie Leve. She has had a GTF (graduate teaching fellowship) at PSI since September of 2014, completing assessments for the Early Growth and Development Study (EGDS) as well as other research-related tasks. Her career goals include research and clinical work with children and adolescents and is specifically interested in the mental health outcomes of at-risk youth. Her current work focuses on the impact of relational aggression on suicidal ideation of girls in foster care.

 

Arian Mobasser, MS, is a doctoral student in developmental psychology at the University of Oregon who is working under the mentorship of Dr. Jennifer Pfeifer. His research is focused primarily on self- and socioemotional development during adolescence and their implications for healthy brain development. Arian's current project uses functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to better understand the behavioral and neural effects of socioemotional context on adolescent decision making.

 

Harpreet Nagra, MC, MS, is a counseling psychology doctoral candidate at University of Oregon. In 2013–2014 she was a first-year predoc DEEP fellow and a second-year clinical extern at the Child and Family Center. Her clinical and research interests include exploring relationship dynamics among marginalized families and couples, in particular, understanding intimate partner violence.

 

Shannon Peake, MA, is a doctoral student in developmental psychology at the University of Oregon. His research interests focus on the influence of social factors on cognitive skills and brain development. Currently he is exploring the effect of social rejection on adolescent risk decisions with the intent of determining the extent to which certain adolescents may be more susceptible to making poor choices in social situations. The studies combine behavioral and neuroimaging approaches to explore how the development of social and emotional regions of the adolescent brain contribute to decision making.

 

Aleksandria Perez, BA, is a doctoral student in counseling psychology at the University of Oregon who is working under the mentorship of Dr. Atika Khurana. She was awarded a diversity supplemental research grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse in Summer 2014 and since then has been working at the PSI under the direction of Dr. Leslie Leve on the Early Growth and Development Study (EGDS). Her career goals involve working with children, adolescents, and parents in underserved communities to understand and predict risk behaviors, with particular interest in research on the developmental and contextual predicators of problem behaviors in children and adolescents and long-term outcomes.